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  • Peeking into the Wildlife Rehabilitator’s World January 29, 2015
    When I first read Crow Planet by Lyanda Lynn Haupt I remember being absolutely transported to another place as I tried to picture a day in the life of a wildlife rehabilitator, like Ms. Haupt herself. When I learned that my husband’s bandmate’s new love interest was also a wildlife rehabilitator, I knew I had […] We love hearing from you! Please click here t […]
    Jesse Elwert
  • Hackberry January 27, 2015
    Here on Snow Mountain, in the Blue Ridge Mountains of Virginia, I see quite a few hackberry trees, Celtis occidentalis. Most are trees with circumferences of 5 inches or smaller, trees that have not been around long. Their small size may be, in part, because the forest up here is a young forest. Back in the 1950s […] We love hearing from you! Please click he […]
    Brenda Clements Jones
  • Beer and Butterflies, Hops and Commas January 26, 2015
    This is the time of year I think most of us gardening folk are itching to get back out there tending to our plants and critters.  I’ve been taking inventory of my seeds, shopping around for new bee boxes and bird houses and mentally designing new flower beds.  Since my brother and I spend so […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beau […]
    Judy Burris
  • Florida Winter Birds January 23, 2015
    I’ve had two recent avian visitors that for me are a real treat.  You see migrating birds aren’t exclusively a phenomenon of northern climes.  Florida also has migratory visitors, some merely passing through and some that stay a few months but don’t breed here. If you prepare a Florida winter wildlife garden to their liking, […] We love hearing from you! Ple […]
    Loret T. Setters
  • The Undisclosed Location January 22, 2015
    I love January in Southern California’s Santa Monica Mountains. Recent rain has brought new life to the drought-stricken soil, and new spring green seedlings are sprouting up everywhere. Trails are still wet one week after our 1-day rainstorm.  After waiting all year for rain, native plants waste no time in asserting themselves. This month, the air […] We lo […]
    Kathy Vilim
  • Dead Wood is Not Dead Weight January 21, 2015
    Dead wood from trees provides abundant habitat for wildlife in your garden. We talk often of the value of native trees in your wildlife garden. Trees provide all manner of ecosystem services, and provide food and shelter for many different kinds of wildlife. In fact, native trees support vastly larger numbers of different species of […] We love hearing from […]
    Carole Sevilla Brown
  • Arbor Day? Yes! And It’s All About Florida Trees! January 16, 2015
    Florida weather puts us ahead of the April National Arbor Day planting curve.  The third Friday of January is officially designated as Florida Arbor Day (in Louisiana too!).   Tis our dry season, so I suppose we plant now to get the roots reaching deep for water before rainy season hits and makes it easy.  This […] We love hearing from you! Please click here […]
    Loret T. Setters
  • Can I Make a Difference? January 15, 2015
    How many of you ponder this question? You’re living in a house with a small yard in an urban area. After you plant your tomato and pepper plants, there just isn’t much room left. You hung up a bird feeder – could you do more, you wonder? You hear about the problems with the bees […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos […]
    Ellen Honeycutt
  • Resources for Planning Your Wildlife Garden January 14, 2015
    It’s the Dreaming Season–winter is upon us, and for most of us snow and cold are keeping us inside where it’s warm and cozy, and not outside working in our wildlife gardens. This is the perfect time to plan, and dream about, the steps we will take in our gardens in the coming spring to […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful […]
    Carole Sevilla Brown

#GardenChat

Seed GROW Project: Miserable May

Oh, where to begin? The snow that fell early in May gave way to unusually warm temperatures the rest of the month. The past week and a half the temperatures hovered around 85 degrees everyday (it felt a lot like August!) and there’s been no rain. June is now here, and though the first few days were also very warm and humid, rain arrived last night and it hasn’t stopped yet. Yesterday was 80 degrees… the temperature today is 54.

In one month the Spitfire nasturtiums have endured snow, heat, drought and now heavy rain. They’ve seen it all..and they are a little worse for wear. If the weather isn’t crazy enough, the stressed plants have fallen prey to insects as well. Yup…something is feasting on the foliage.

Now I must confess. We’ve been very busy with a new landscaping project in the front of our house. A small border has turned into a wide swath and though it’s been really fun to plant, the other gardens have been mostly ignored. Including the plot with my Spitfire nasturtiums. I took them for granted. I’ve always had great luck growing nasturtiums and they’ve never been bothered by pests (though aphids are their biggest nuisance).  Our new project is almost complete and I plan to spend most of the week weeding, feeding and planting in the gardens. Hopefully these little plants are merely lonely for some attention and they’ll perk up quickly. Until then, I’m enjoying these blooms in the garden from nasturtiums that re-seeded after last summer…

Go figure. The nasturtiums in the garden are as fickle as the weather in May!

Remember to follow the grow-along fun with the other garden bloggers and see how their Spitfire nasturtiums are growing! You can find a list of participating friends here: Gardenbloggers.com.

“I’m growing Nasturtium “Spitfire” for the GROW project, thanks to ReneesGarden.com for the seeds”

4 comments to Seed GROW Project: Miserable May

  • Sorry to hear about your crazy weather but I hope thing have settled and that your nasturtiums bounce back.

  • Lisa Gustavson

    Ahh..such fickle weather. Feast or famine with rain and sun, LOL! Thank you for the well wishes and keep your fingers crossed!:-)

  • TC

    I’m not at all impressed by the growth habit of ‘Spitfire.’ I think it’s because I’m used to a much more vigorous viner/climber. Mine is in a pot with a black-eyed Susan vine, and I’m allowing both to trail out and down a pedestal that the pot is sitting on. I’m not one to help climbers climb. And if ‘Spitfire’ can’t climb on it’s own, I won’t fool with keeping stems tied to wire. I’m growin it more to eat anyway. They’re really nice and peppery in a garden salad.

  • Lisa Gustavson

    I’m hoping Spitfire will have the same resilience as the other nasturtiums that are thriving in my garden this year. I’m finally seeing them them stretch out a bit, though hey are trailing as you said. The best climbing nasturtium I’ve grown is Peaches and Cream..the grew over our grape arbor in just a few weeks! Thankfully, climbing or not, all nasturtiums are delicious and attractive in sandwiches, salads, vinegars and more. :-)

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