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  • The Mydas Touch (Part Deux) September 26, 2014
    This week I got an email from Bugguide giving confirmation of a fly species that graced my place a year ago.  I had pretty much forgotten about the submission, but the confirmation had a timely arrival since I was stumped earlier in the week on what I might write about today. Oddly, these insects are […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all […]
    Loret T. Setters
  • Yellow And Blue Rings True September 25, 2014
    Yellow and blue flower combinations are some of the most appealing and at no time is that more apparent in the native wildflower world than in late summer and early fall. I find myself compelled to take pictures when I find them together – if only to capture some of that magic for another day. […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the be […]
    Ellen Honeycutt
  • It’s Goldfinch Season September 24, 2014
    Have you been noticing lots of Goldfinches in your wildlife garden this fall? I’ve been regularly spotting a flock of over 30 American Goldfinch in my backyard wildlife garden and the abandoned property next door, which has become quite weedy and filled with Pokeweed, Cutleaf Coneflower, Common Milkweed, Boneset, and much more. Gone is the […] We love hearin […]
    Carole Sevilla Brown
  • Drone & Pop! September 23, 2014
    So I walk out to my native plant plot one morning in early August. What is that droning sound I hear? I listen for a while and then it was obvious! The section of my garden which is full of Partridge Pea (Chamaecrista fasciculate) was buzzing with hundreds of bees! I was amazed at the […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful p […]
    Joni James
  • Sunflowers ideal for elementary curriculum September 22, 2014
    See the white bumps at the base of each floret? Once they fully emerged, they were shiny, black sunflower seeds. Everybody wanted a piece of them — the squirrels, the birds, the chipmunks — you get the idea. But I needed some, too. Despite the tough competition, we managed to extract some seeds for ourselves. We […] We love hearing from you! Please click her […]
    Stacey Evers
  • Killer on the Loose September 19, 2014
    Tis the time of year when huge “bees” are flying all over the yard.  They aren’t actually bees, but bumblebee mimics and they prey on the very insects they resemble.  Meet a Robberfly (Mallophora bomboides), a member of the insect order Diptera.  This particular species is commonly called “Florida Bee Killer” due to their preferred […] We love hearing from y […]
    Loret T. Setters
  • Lights, Camera, Action: Hollywood’s Fan Palms September 18, 2014
    Sprinklers let loose— Water is softly spraying a neighbor’s yard, and it sounds nice, even though it is only a plain green lawn that’s benefiting.  Well, not just a lawn— Out the window I see both a tall California Fan Palm (Washingtonia filifera) and a more robust Phoenix Palm (Phoenix Cunninghamiana) standing together in the […] We love hearing from you! P […]
    Kathy Vilim
  • When the Gall Moves, it Probably isn’t a Gall September 12, 2014
    I was walking past the Bald Cypress (Taxodium distichum) tree, one of two saplings I have planted on the southwest side of the pond. Bald-cypress are known for getting species-specific insects known as Cypress Twig Gall Midge (Taxodiomyia cupressiananassa). The smaller of my two trees has a few sprinkled throughout. Galls are housing created from […] We love […]
    Loret T. Setters
  • Gardening for Wildlife at the Flower Farm September 11, 2014
    On September 28th last year (2012), my husband and I closed on our first home, a 1.5 acre property that backs out to a nature preserve and is surrounded by woods on all four sides. I wrote about our gardening efforts last year in an article I called “Wildlife Gardening in Rivendell,” because the property […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see […]
    Jesse Elwert

#GardenChat

Seed GROW Project: Miserable May

Oh, where to begin? The snow that fell early in May gave way to unusually warm temperatures the rest of the month. The past week and a half the temperatures hovered around 85 degrees everyday (it felt a lot like August!) and there’s been no rain. June is now here, and though the first few days were also very warm and humid, rain arrived last night and it hasn’t stopped yet. Yesterday was 80 degrees… the temperature today is 54.

In one month the Spitfire nasturtiums have endured snow, heat, drought and now heavy rain. They’ve seen it all..and they are a little worse for wear. If the weather isn’t crazy enough, the stressed plants have fallen prey to insects as well. Yup…something is feasting on the foliage.

Now I must confess. We’ve been very busy with a new landscaping project in the front of our house. A small border has turned into a wide swath and though it’s been really fun to plant, the other gardens have been mostly ignored. Including the plot with my Spitfire nasturtiums. I took them for granted. I’ve always had great luck growing nasturtiums and they’ve never been bothered by pests (though aphids are their biggest nuisance).  Our new project is almost complete and I plan to spend most of the week weeding, feeding and planting in the gardens. Hopefully these little plants are merely lonely for some attention and they’ll perk up quickly. Until then, I’m enjoying these blooms in the garden from nasturtiums that re-seeded after last summer…

Go figure. The nasturtiums in the garden are as fickle as the weather in May!

Remember to follow the grow-along fun with the other garden bloggers and see how their Spitfire nasturtiums are growing! You can find a list of participating friends here: Gardenbloggers.com.

“I’m growing Nasturtium “Spitfire” for the GROW project, thanks to ReneesGarden.com for the seeds”

4 comments to Seed GROW Project: Miserable May

  • Sorry to hear about your crazy weather but I hope thing have settled and that your nasturtiums bounce back.

  • Lisa Gustavson

    Ahh..such fickle weather. Feast or famine with rain and sun, LOL! Thank you for the well wishes and keep your fingers crossed!:-)

  • TC

    I’m not at all impressed by the growth habit of ‘Spitfire.’ I think it’s because I’m used to a much more vigorous viner/climber. Mine is in a pot with a black-eyed Susan vine, and I’m allowing both to trail out and down a pedestal that the pot is sitting on. I’m not one to help climbers climb. And if ‘Spitfire’ can’t climb on it’s own, I won’t fool with keeping stems tied to wire. I’m growin it more to eat anyway. They’re really nice and peppery in a garden salad.

  • Lisa Gustavson

    I’m hoping Spitfire will have the same resilience as the other nasturtiums that are thriving in my garden this year. I’m finally seeing them them stretch out a bit, though hey are trailing as you said. The best climbing nasturtium I’ve grown is Peaches and Cream..the grew over our grape arbor in just a few weeks! Thankfully, climbing or not, all nasturtiums are delicious and attractive in sandwiches, salads, vinegars and more. :-)

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