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  • National Moth Week 2015: Central Florida July 24, 2015
    Well, another year has passed and we are in the midst of National Moth Week. It started back in 2012 and I have reported on moths I find at my place each year. In keeping with that tradition, I am reporting this year on some different moths that have made an appearance at my place […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photo […]
    Loret T. Setters
  • Island Comeback July 17, 2015
    I have a tussock; that is a floating island in my pond.  The tussock appeared on its own in September 2011 and has sometimes disappeared at the start of winter, such as back in 2013 and again in 2014. Thankfully my floating island has reappeared as spring turns to summer each year.  I am grateful […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the […]
    Loret T. Setters
  • Unplanting for the Pollinators July 16, 2015
    We focus so much on “planting” for pollinators, but there are times when we should be removing plants in order to support our pollinators. You ask, “How could removing plants possibly help our pollinators, don’t they need the plants to survive?” The answer is “Yes, they do need plants to survive.” They need specific plants […] We love hearing from you! Pleas […]
    Ellen Honeycutt
  • The Dizzying World of Hummingbirds July 14, 2015
    During the summer, I get the gleeful feeling my cabin is part of a huge merry-go-round. The innermost portion of the revolving machine, where the calliope is housed, is the cabin, which stays still. Normally the portion of the merry-go-round that small children and those young at heart, ride, is filled with lions, tigers, bears and horses, […] We love hearin […]
    Brenda Clements Jones
  • Garden Royalty, Dragonfly Style July 10, 2015
    Always on the hunt for new encounters in my beautiful wildlife garden to blog about, I was down in the pond area peeking under leaves and flowers to see if I could find any new-to-me species of interest.  I noticed a big dragonfly swooping over the pond.  Because of the large size, I automatically figured […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to se […]
    Loret T. Setters
  • Specks of Spiders July 3, 2015
    Do you wipe webs off your plant leaves?  A few months back in late 2014 I had noticed some webbing on my Meyer Lemon tree.  “Meyer” lemon is a hybrid between a true lemon and mandarin orange and it is one of the non-native “cash crops” a.k.a. edibles that grace my beautiful wildlife garden.  I […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the be […]
    Loret T. Setters
  • Did that Cocoon Just Walk Away? June 19, 2015
    I love when something in my garden is being chewed on.  It means I am providing habitat and food for some species.  Needless to say, I got quite excited when I was down by the gate recently and I spotted a particular Sawtooth Blackberry (Rubus pensilvanicus) plant that looked all lacy. I have hundreds of […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see […]
    Loret T. Setters
  • The Box Turtle In The Garden June 17, 2015
    There is a precious, little animal inside that shell, his head sticking out of the house on his back, like an old man. They come out during wet weather. If it is raining, I can pretty well count on finding one trying to cross the road, no matter where my travels take me. I’ve made […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photo […]
    Brenda Clements Jones
  • Finding butterflies in my wildlife garden June 16, 2015
    The month of June is already shaping up to be a productive time for the butterflies that are supported by my beautiful wildlife garden.  As I was weeding and watering my veggie garden, a lovely Clouded Sulphur butterfly gracefully glided onto a patch of clover at my feet and deposited a single egg.  I bring […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to […]
    Judy Burris

#GardenChat

Seed GROW Project: Miserable May

Oh, where to begin? The snow that fell early in May gave way to unusually warm temperatures the rest of the month. The past week and a half the temperatures hovered around 85 degrees everyday (it felt a lot like August!) and there’s been no rain. June is now here, and though the first few days were also very warm and humid, rain arrived last night and it hasn’t stopped yet. Yesterday was 80 degrees… the temperature today is 54.

In one month the Spitfire nasturtiums have endured snow, heat, drought and now heavy rain. They’ve seen it all..and they are a little worse for wear. If the weather isn’t crazy enough, the stressed plants have fallen prey to insects as well. Yup…something is feasting on the foliage.

Now I must confess. We’ve been very busy with a new landscaping project in the front of our house. A small border has turned into a wide swath and though it’s been really fun to plant, the other gardens have been mostly ignored. Including the plot with my Spitfire nasturtiums. I took them for granted. I’ve always had great luck growing nasturtiums and they’ve never been bothered by pests (though aphids are their biggest nuisance).  Our new project is almost complete and I plan to spend most of the week weeding, feeding and planting in the gardens. Hopefully these little plants are merely lonely for some attention and they’ll perk up quickly. Until then, I’m enjoying these blooms in the garden from nasturtiums that re-seeded after last summer…

Go figure. The nasturtiums in the garden are as fickle as the weather in May!

Remember to follow the grow-along fun with the other garden bloggers and see how their Spitfire nasturtiums are growing! You can find a list of participating friends here: Gardenbloggers.com.

“I’m growing Nasturtium “Spitfire” for the GROW project, thanks to ReneesGarden.com for the seeds”

4 comments to Seed GROW Project: Miserable May

  • Sorry to hear about your crazy weather but I hope thing have settled and that your nasturtiums bounce back.

  • Lisa Gustavson

    Ahh..such fickle weather. Feast or famine with rain and sun, LOL! Thank you for the well wishes and keep your fingers crossed!:-)

  • TC

    I’m not at all impressed by the growth habit of ‘Spitfire.’ I think it’s because I’m used to a much more vigorous viner/climber. Mine is in a pot with a black-eyed Susan vine, and I’m allowing both to trail out and down a pedestal that the pot is sitting on. I’m not one to help climbers climb. And if ‘Spitfire’ can’t climb on it’s own, I won’t fool with keeping stems tied to wire. I’m growin it more to eat anyway. They’re really nice and peppery in a garden salad.

  • Lisa Gustavson

    I’m hoping Spitfire will have the same resilience as the other nasturtiums that are thriving in my garden this year. I’m finally seeing them them stretch out a bit, though hey are trailing as you said. The best climbing nasturtium I’ve grown is Peaches and Cream..the grew over our grape arbor in just a few weeks! Thankfully, climbing or not, all nasturtiums are delicious and attractive in sandwiches, salads, vinegars and more. :-)

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