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  • In the Garden: Cloudy with a Chance of Confusion August 29, 2014
    I met a new butterfly this week.  This particular butterfly is one of the skippers. Skippers are in the Superfamily Hesperioidea, as opposed to say, Swallowtails or Milkweed Butterflies that are in the Papilionoidea Superfamily encompassing Butterflies (excluding skippers). Skippers are a diverse bunch and often hard to identify. This skipper was rather larg […]
    Loret T. Setters
  • Native Plants Beyond the Garden August 28, 2014
    I love having native plants in my garden. Every moment that I can do so finds me slipping into the garden to find a beautiful flower, a hummingbird sipping on cardinal flower (Lobelia cardinalis), an insect collecting food or collecting prey, and to listen to the sweet song of birds. As much as I love […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see al […]
    Ellen Honeycutt
  • When a Tree Falls in the Schoolyard August 25, 2014
    We had only one shade tree at our suburban DC elementary school, a 50ish-year-old pin oak, and it was cut down over the summer without notice. After the shock and swearing wore off, I started thinking about how we could use what remained. Almost anything can be turned into a lesson, including a prominently placed […] We love hearing from you! Please click he […]
    Stacey Evers
  • The Worms Crawl In but Do They Swim? August 22, 2014
    This week I noticed that there was some webbing on a Baldcypress tree I planted a while back. At some point my property was likely home to many of these trees as is evident by decaying knees I see when the pond level gets low.  These majestic trees require wet conditions during part of the year […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the b […]
    Loret T. Setters
  • Native Shrubs for Small Gardens August 19, 2014
    For those with small wildlife gardens, gardening with native plants has always been a challenge. Natives tend to be not just large size but absolutely huge. Fortunately the nursery industry is responding to the growing demand for wildlife friendly native plants for the small space garden. Plant breeders have come out with some outstanding dwarf […] We love h […]
    Karyl Seppala
  • Wildlife Deception as a Defense August 15, 2014
    Tanner, the English Setter was headed out for his afternoon stroll of the yard.  I saw something over behind a tall cluster of Bidens alba and it seemed to be thrashing.  Tanner zoomed on over and flushed out a Red-Shouldered Hawk.  The hawk flew off with its feathers somewhat ruffled in the quick getaway. Tanner […] We love hearing from you! Please click he […]
    Loret T. Setters
  • Baldcypress Ecosystem August 13, 2014
    Birding in Delaware at Trap Pond State Park, a baldcypress ecosystem. After a wonderful trip aboard the Mummichog II for the Cape Water Taxi Ecotour to explore the ecosystem of the Indian River Bay in southeastern Delaware, today we headed to southwestern Delaware to explore a fresh water ecosystem. Trap Pond State Park, near Laurel, […] We love hearing from […]
    Carole Sevilla Brown
  • Cardinal Flower August 12, 2014
      Hummingbirds love it. So do I. If it was a Corvette Stingray, the color would be called “Victory Red.” It is a blazing, brilliant, red, not often seen in a native plant. In the picture above, you see a sweat bee, using a leaf as a resting spot on the Cardinal Flower’s, Lobelia cardinalis, landing […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all t […]
    Brenda Clements Jones
  • Raising Question Mark butterflies August 11, 2014
    Question Mark butterflies can be elusive if you don’t know how to attract them to your beautiful wildlife garden. They are drawn more to sap runs (often created by woodpeckers) and rotting fruit than the flowers in your yard. If you have a plum or cherry tree you may see these and other butterflies feeding […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to s […]
    Judy Burris

#GardenChat

Seed GROW Project: Miserable May

Oh, where to begin? The snow that fell early in May gave way to unusually warm temperatures the rest of the month. The past week and a half the temperatures hovered around 85 degrees everyday (it felt a lot like August!) and there’s been no rain. June is now here, and though the first few days were also very warm and humid, rain arrived last night and it hasn’t stopped yet. Yesterday was 80 degrees… the temperature today is 54.

In one month the Spitfire nasturtiums have endured snow, heat, drought and now heavy rain. They’ve seen it all..and they are a little worse for wear. If the weather isn’t crazy enough, the stressed plants have fallen prey to insects as well. Yup…something is feasting on the foliage.

Now I must confess. We’ve been very busy with a new landscaping project in the front of our house. A small border has turned into a wide swath and though it’s been really fun to plant, the other gardens have been mostly ignored. Including the plot with my Spitfire nasturtiums. I took them for granted. I’ve always had great luck growing nasturtiums and they’ve never been bothered by pests (though aphids are their biggest nuisance).  Our new project is almost complete and I plan to spend most of the week weeding, feeding and planting in the gardens. Hopefully these little plants are merely lonely for some attention and they’ll perk up quickly. Until then, I’m enjoying these blooms in the garden from nasturtiums that re-seeded after last summer…

Go figure. The nasturtiums in the garden are as fickle as the weather in May!

Remember to follow the grow-along fun with the other garden bloggers and see how their Spitfire nasturtiums are growing! You can find a list of participating friends here: Gardenbloggers.com.

“I’m growing Nasturtium “Spitfire” for the GROW project, thanks to ReneesGarden.com for the seeds”

4 comments to Seed GROW Project: Miserable May

  • Sorry to hear about your crazy weather but I hope thing have settled and that your nasturtiums bounce back.

  • Lisa Gustavson

    Ahh..such fickle weather. Feast or famine with rain and sun, LOL! Thank you for the well wishes and keep your fingers crossed!:-)

  • TC

    I’m not at all impressed by the growth habit of ‘Spitfire.’ I think it’s because I’m used to a much more vigorous viner/climber. Mine is in a pot with a black-eyed Susan vine, and I’m allowing both to trail out and down a pedestal that the pot is sitting on. I’m not one to help climbers climb. And if ‘Spitfire’ can’t climb on it’s own, I won’t fool with keeping stems tied to wire. I’m growin it more to eat anyway. They’re really nice and peppery in a garden salad.

  • Lisa Gustavson

    I’m hoping Spitfire will have the same resilience as the other nasturtiums that are thriving in my garden this year. I’m finally seeing them them stretch out a bit, though hey are trailing as you said. The best climbing nasturtium I’ve grown is Peaches and Cream..the grew over our grape arbor in just a few weeks! Thankfully, climbing or not, all nasturtiums are delicious and attractive in sandwiches, salads, vinegars and more. :-)

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