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  • National Moth Week 2015: Central Florida July 24, 2015
    Well, another year has passed and we are in the midst of National Moth Week. It started back in 2012 and I have reported on moths I find at my place each year. In keeping with that tradition, I am reporting this year on some different moths that have made an appearance at my place […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photo […]
    Loret T. Setters
  • Island Comeback July 17, 2015
    I have a tussock; that is a floating island in my pond.  The tussock appeared on its own in September 2011 and has sometimes disappeared at the start of winter, such as back in 2013 and again in 2014. Thankfully my floating island has reappeared as spring turns to summer each year.  I am grateful […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the […]
    Loret T. Setters
  • Unplanting for the Pollinators July 16, 2015
    We focus so much on “planting” for pollinators, but there are times when we should be removing plants in order to support our pollinators. You ask, “How could removing plants possibly help our pollinators, don’t they need the plants to survive?” The answer is “Yes, they do need plants to survive.” They need specific plants […] We love hearing from you! Pleas […]
    Ellen Honeycutt
  • The Dizzying World of Hummingbirds July 14, 2015
    During the summer, I get the gleeful feeling my cabin is part of a huge merry-go-round. The innermost portion of the revolving machine, where the calliope is housed, is the cabin, which stays still. Normally the portion of the merry-go-round that small children and those young at heart, ride, is filled with lions, tigers, bears and horses, […] We love hearin […]
    Brenda Clements Jones
  • Garden Royalty, Dragonfly Style July 10, 2015
    Always on the hunt for new encounters in my beautiful wildlife garden to blog about, I was down in the pond area peeking under leaves and flowers to see if I could find any new-to-me species of interest.  I noticed a big dragonfly swooping over the pond.  Because of the large size, I automatically figured […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to se […]
    Loret T. Setters
  • Specks of Spiders July 3, 2015
    Do you wipe webs off your plant leaves?  A few months back in late 2014 I had noticed some webbing on my Meyer Lemon tree.  “Meyer” lemon is a hybrid between a true lemon and mandarin orange and it is one of the non-native “cash crops” a.k.a. edibles that grace my beautiful wildlife garden.  I […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the be […]
    Loret T. Setters
  • Did that Cocoon Just Walk Away? June 19, 2015
    I love when something in my garden is being chewed on.  It means I am providing habitat and food for some species.  Needless to say, I got quite excited when I was down by the gate recently and I spotted a particular Sawtooth Blackberry (Rubus pensilvanicus) plant that looked all lacy. I have hundreds of […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see […]
    Loret T. Setters
  • The Box Turtle In The Garden June 17, 2015
    There is a precious, little animal inside that shell, his head sticking out of the house on his back, like an old man. They come out during wet weather. If it is raining, I can pretty well count on finding one trying to cross the road, no matter where my travels take me. I’ve made […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photo […]
    Brenda Clements Jones
  • Finding butterflies in my wildlife garden June 16, 2015
    The month of June is already shaping up to be a productive time for the butterflies that are supported by my beautiful wildlife garden.  As I was weeding and watering my veggie garden, a lovely Clouded Sulphur butterfly gracefully glided onto a patch of clover at my feet and deposited a single egg.  I bring […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to […]
    Judy Burris

#GardenChat

Green and Easy, Down the Row I Go

Have you got a problem? Do what you can where you are with what you’ve got.

~T. Roosevelt

Every now and then a random conversation will spark an idea for a blog post.  Yesterday I mentioned that liquid kelp is a valuable and nutrient rich fertilizer for plants to a vegan friend who was searching for an alternative to animal-based fertilizers. That got me to thinking about the organic solutions I use created from other plants and used as fertilizers and preventatives. The best time to spray plants is in the cool early morning or late afternoon. Always test the spray on a few leaves first, if there’s no negative reaction, treat the entire plant. Julia, these are for you!

Fertilizers:

  • Liquid Kelp (or seaweed) is valuable in starting seeds, preventing damping off and makes a nutrient rich foliar spray for indoor and outdoor plants. The plants’ leaves and roots store the nutrients so apply only 3x a season: at the seedling stage, upon setting plants out and at the blossoming stage.
  • Compost Tea: Used like manure tea only it’s made from your own kitchen compost. To make simply put 2 c. of compost into a mesh bag, old pantyhose, sock etc. and place into 1 gallon of water. Let steep for 48 hours. For large outdoor gardens put two shovel-fulls of compost into a large container  and fill with water. Let sit 48 hours before using.

Prevention:

  • Damping off: Chamomile Tea used to treat the soil when starting seeds will prevent damping off.
  • Powdery Mildew: Horsetail tea (yes, horsetail that horrible invasive weed!) can be used effectively against powdery mildew on vegetables. A few dried leaves mixed into a gallon of water and allowed to steep for a day will make a concentrate that needs to be diluted before use. Mix 1 part tea to 5 parts water for use as a foliar spray.
  • Downey Mildew: Chive spray. Chopped chives simmered in hot water for a few minutes and strained will make an effective foliar spray for cucumbers and winter and summer squash. It also helps to repel chewing insects.
  • Black Spot: Apple cider vinegar (about 2-3 Tbsp.) mixed into a gallon of water and sprayed on roses will treat leaves affected by black spot.

There are many more. It’s worth taking a little time to read and research natural organic methods to use in the garden as preventatives and solutions to problems. It’s just as easy to mix up an herbal foliar spray as it is a harmful, synthetic concentrated one. The big difference is your health, the health of your garden and the beneficial organisms living in it. For more solutions visit the concoctions page.  Green and easy!



6 comments to Green and Easy, Down the Row I Go

  • You know, today’s the first time I’ve ever heard of using seaweed as a fertiliser, but it sounds pretty tempting to give a try considering how good it’s supposed to be for humans. Is it easy to find in stores?

  • Lisa Gustavson

    It’s an excellent fertilizer! It’s available in stores as a liquid concentrate. It may be called liquid seaweed, liquid kelp or sea kelp concentrate. All are the same thing and are used the same way; dilute with water. If you’ve not used it before you are in for a surprise! Your plants will be stronger and greener and healthier. Best of luck! :-)

  • [...] Green and Easy, Down the Row I Go « Get in the Garden [...]

  • I have to agree with Josh, I have never heard of seaweed as a fertilizer. Sounds like it can work wonders though. I will certainly take it into consideration

  • Stacy

    Excellent info! I also like the nod to Dierks Bentley. :)

  • Lisa Gustavson

    Thank you! I’m glad you found the information helpful..and my reference, LOL!

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