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  • Florida Winter Birds January 23, 2015
    I’ve had two recent avian visitors that for me are a real treat.  You see migrating birds aren’t exclusively a phenomenon of northern climes.  Florida also has migratory visitors, some merely passing through and some that stay a few months but don’t breed here. If you prepare a Florida winter wildlife garden to their liking, […] We love hearing from you! Ple […]
    Loret T. Setters
  • The Undisclosed Location January 22, 2015
    I love January in Southern California’s Santa Monica Mountains. Recent rain has brought new life to the drought-stricken soil, and new spring green seedlings are sprouting up everywhere. Trails are still wet one week after our 1-day rainstorm.  After waiting all year for rain, native plants waste no time in asserting themselves. This month, the air […] We lo […]
    Kathy Vilim
  • Dead Wood is Not Dead Weight January 21, 2015
    Dead wood from trees provides abundant habitat for wildlife in your garden. We talk often of the value of native trees in your wildlife garden. Trees provide all manner of ecosystem services, and provide food and shelter for many different kinds of wildlife. In fact, native trees support vastly larger numbers of different species of […] We love hearing from […]
    Carole Sevilla Brown
  • Arbor Day? Yes! And It’s All About Florida Trees! January 16, 2015
    Florida weather puts us ahead of the April National Arbor Day planting curve.  The third Friday of January is officially designated as Florida Arbor Day (in Louisiana too!).   Tis our dry season, so I suppose we plant now to get the roots reaching deep for water before rainy season hits and makes it easy.  This […] We love hearing from you! Please click here […]
    Loret T. Setters
  • Can I Make a Difference? January 15, 2015
    How many of you ponder this question? You’re living in a house with a small yard in an urban area. After you plant your tomato and pepper plants, there just isn’t much room left. You hung up a bird feeder – could you do more, you wonder? You hear about the problems with the bees […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos […]
    Ellen Honeycutt
  • Resources for Planning Your Wildlife Garden January 14, 2015
    It’s the Dreaming Season–winter is upon us, and for most of us snow and cold are keeping us inside where it’s warm and cozy, and not outside working in our wildlife gardens. This is the perfect time to plan, and dream about, the steps we will take in our gardens in the coming spring to […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful […]
    Carole Sevilla Brown
  • Start your rain barrels now January 12, 2015
    This is Old Man Winter’s time, which at a school can translate into a lot of indoor recess time and little to no garden time. Here’s a winter project to keep students’ minds on the gardens and focus their energy when they can’t get outside: Painting rain barrels. We have two rain barrels at Belvedere. Although we don’t use […] We love hearing from you! Pleas […]
    Stacey Evers
  • Planthoppers: Coming to a Lilypad Near You January 10, 2015
    I’m always trying to think ahead of ideas for articles here at Beautiful Wildlife Garden and Native Plants and Wildlife Gardens, two of the blogs where I regularly share tales of the flora and fauna finds in my own garden. In anticipation, I have been gathering photos which convey the biodiversity that American White Waterlily […] We love hearing from you! P […]
    Loret T. Setters
  • Cattails For Wildlife January 7, 2015
      Cattails (Typha spp) are a wetland plant that provides food and habitat for wildlife including birds, frogs and toads, muskrats and more. Last week I visited Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge near Cambridge, MD and was a bit surprised to observe the Cattails releasing their fluffy seeds into the wind in late December. Usually the […] We love hearing from […]
    Carole Sevilla Brown

#GardenChat

Heirloom Vegetables: Art in the Garden

While I sift through seed packets and sketch out garden plans for the summer garden I am reminded again just how valuable heirloom seeds are. The history and heritage of each is a fascinating look back at gardening in countries all over the world. Seeds were lovingly collected and saved, safely tucked away for the long voyage to this country and started anew. Amazing!

As I look to my list and arrange plants in their proper places on paper, I’m also struck by the beautiful “pictures” I can create in the garden with heirloom vegetables. A stroke of purple from eggplant Listada and a hint of Caspian Pink tomato blended with Golden Sweet peas paints a Monet-worthy picture. For eye-popping color, the vividly colored Bright Lights chard, Tequila Sunrise peppers and Mascara lettuce yields a Warhol effect. Renaissance still-life paintings come to life in the textures and lines of Costoluto tomato, Marina di Chiogga squash and Prescott Fond Blanc melon. Heirloom art that grows!

I play with my food…  I like to mix the plants up, mingling the vegetables and the flowers, planting my own “works of art”. Each year as I plant my appreciation of the beauty and details of each blossom and fruit grows. Heirloom seeds are true treasures, they’re art in the garden!

Brode Galeux d'Eyesine heirloom squash.

Brode Galeux d'Eyesine heirloom squash.

6 comments to Heirloom Vegetables: Art in the Garden

  • I play with my veggies, too. :) It’s always a fun surprise when people checking out the flower beds spot beans and cherry tomatoes sharing the space.

  • There is nothing better than an Heirloom variety of tomato. Ahh, mouth is watering just thinking about them. — Matti

  • Lisa

    I love the looks of surprise! It’s even better when friends come back and say “I planted vegetables in my flowers, too!” WOO HOO! :-)

  • Lisa

    Very true… heirloom tomatoes are far superior in taste, color and nutrition, the fact they they are so beautiful is a bonus! Enjoy and thanks for sharing, Matti!

  • Beautifully evocative post! (Can you honestly get sweet peas to bloom while tomatoes are ripening, though? Not in this climate. ;) )

  • Lisa

    My earliest ripening tomatoes come on in the first week of July and the peas are ripe around the third week of June so…maybe!! (Though the earliest tomatoes are determinate and “Caspian Pink” isn’t so that combination won’t work.) I love the possibilities! It’s almost as fun planning the plant combinations as it is harvesting the fruit of our labor! Enjoy and thank you for visiting!

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