February 2010
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Heirloom Vegetables: Art in the Garden

While I sift through seed packets and sketch out garden plans for the summer garden I am reminded again just how valuable heirloom seeds are. The history and heritage of each is a fascinating look back at gardening in countries all over the world. Seeds were lovingly collected and saved, safely tucked away for the long voyage to this country and started anew. Amazing!

As I look to my list and arrange plants in their proper places on paper, I’m also struck by the beautiful “pictures” I can create in the garden with heirloom vegetables. A stroke of purple from eggplant Listada and a hint of Caspian Pink tomato blended with Golden Sweet peas paints a Monet-worthy picture. For eye-popping color, the vividly colored Bright Lights chard, Tequila Sunrise peppers and Mascara lettuce yields a Warhol effect. Renaissance still-life paintings come to life in the textures and lines of Costoluto tomato, Marina di Chiogga squash and Prescott Fond Blanc melon. Heirloom art that grows!

I play with my food…  I like to mix the plants up, mingling the vegetables and the flowers, planting my own “works of art”. Each year as I plant my appreciation of the beauty and details of each blossom and fruit grows. Heirloom seeds are true treasures, they’re art in the garden!

Brode Galeux d'Eyesine heirloom squash.

Brode Galeux d'Eyesine heirloom squash.

6 comments to Heirloom Vegetables: Art in the Garden

  • I play with my veggies, too. :) It’s always a fun surprise when people checking out the flower beds spot beans and cherry tomatoes sharing the space.

  • There is nothing better than an Heirloom variety of tomato. Ahh, mouth is watering just thinking about them. — Matti

  • Lisa

    I love the looks of surprise! It’s even better when friends come back and say “I planted vegetables in my flowers, too!” WOO HOO! :-)

  • Lisa

    Very true… heirloom tomatoes are far superior in taste, color and nutrition, the fact they they are so beautiful is a bonus! Enjoy and thanks for sharing, Matti!

  • Beautifully evocative post! (Can you honestly get sweet peas to bloom while tomatoes are ripening, though? Not in this climate. ;) )

  • Lisa

    My earliest ripening tomatoes come on in the first week of July and the peas are ripe around the third week of June so…maybe!! (Though the earliest tomatoes are determinate and “Caspian Pink” isn’t so that combination won’t work.) I love the possibilities! It’s almost as fun planning the plant combinations as it is harvesting the fruit of our labor! Enjoy and thank you for visiting!

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