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  • Snapdragon Shrubs November 25, 2014
    Life in the Southwest is unique in many ways, and tops on the list are plants you don’t find anywhere else on earth. One of these is a shrubby member of the snapdragon family, the Leucophyllum. Native to dry, calcareous areas of Chihuahuan Desert in the states of Texas USA and Chihuahua, Coahuila, Nuevo León, […] We love hearing from you! Please click here t […]
    Jacqueline Soule
  • Create a Portable Composter November 24, 2014
      Now that fall is winding down, you might want to begin thinking towards next year by taking on this project now. Do you do home composting? Have you often wished you had a portable composter? This is a inexpensive project ($20) that can be completed in less than an hour. First you need to […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beaut […]
    Joni James
  • The Monarchs of Venice, California November 22, 2014
    The morning sun rose over the canals of Venice, California, its soft yellow color reflected in the water, as I stood watching the Monarchs, already up and about.  The pocket park they were visiting was still mostly in shade, so I didn’t expect to see the orange-winged beauties until hours later, when the sun would […] We love hearing from you! Please click h […]
    Kathy Vilim
  • Balance in the Garden: Ichneumon Parasitic Wasp November 21, 2014
    Sometime ago I talked about how some wasps keep a garden in balance by using other arthropods as their larval hosts, laying eggs to hatch and feed off the caterpillars of moths or butterflies or beetle larvae.  It’s Nature’s way of ensuring you don’t get too many of one species.  The food chain in action. […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to se […]
    Loret T. Setters
  • Thankful for Nature November 20, 2014
    As I prepare for the Thanksgiving holiday, my list of things to do grows. My mental list of what I am thankful for is in progress as well, and always at the top of that list are the gifts that the natural world has given us. From tiny pollinators to towering oaks, our world would […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos […]
    Ellen Honeycutt
  • Saying Goodbye to All the Plants in My Front Garden November 19, 2014
    Well, it’s digging day. A day I’ve known was coming since we bought our house 14 years ago. Seems that over 100 years ago when my house was built it was considered a good idea to use clay pipes to carry away the sewage from the houses in this neighborhood. Think about it. You know […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photo […]
    Carole Sevilla Brown
  • Teaching native habitats with trout November 17, 2014
    It might seem fishy to set up a 55-gallon fish tank and say you’re going to use to it to teach outdoor education, but so far raising brook trout has been one of the most exciting and engaging projects we’ve taken on at the elementary school where I work. In the local school system, animal […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautif […]
    Stacey Evers
  • Aphids are Good? Wait….WHAT??? November 14, 2014
    Down at my pond recently, I waited patiently for a flower fly to land for a photo op.  I use a point and shoot camera and have yet to find that the sports setting is effective at getting close-up photos of insects so I don’t use it.  I took a random shot or two while […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us k […]
    Loret T. Setters
  • Winter Citizen Science Projects November 12, 2014
    Winter is a fabulous time to participate in a wide variety of citizen science projects to help biologists and scientists gather data for conservation planning and further our knowledge of ecosystem health and population abundance of different types of wildlife. I’m working on building a comprehensive list so I’m going to ask for your help […] We love hearing […]
    Carole Sevilla Brown

#GardenChat

Heirloom Vegetables: Art in the Garden

While I sift through seed packets and sketch out garden plans for the summer garden I am reminded again just how valuable heirloom seeds are. The history and heritage of each is a fascinating look back at gardening in countries all over the world. Seeds were lovingly collected and saved, safely tucked away for the long voyage to this country and started anew. Amazing!

As I look to my list and arrange plants in their proper places on paper, I’m also struck by the beautiful “pictures” I can create in the garden with heirloom vegetables. A stroke of purple from eggplant Listada and a hint of Caspian Pink tomato blended with Golden Sweet peas paints a Monet-worthy picture. For eye-popping color, the vividly colored Bright Lights chard, Tequila Sunrise peppers and Mascara lettuce yields a Warhol effect. Renaissance still-life paintings come to life in the textures and lines of Costoluto tomato, Marina di Chiogga squash and Prescott Fond Blanc melon. Heirloom art that grows!

I play with my food…  I like to mix the plants up, mingling the vegetables and the flowers, planting my own “works of art”. Each year as I plant my appreciation of the beauty and details of each blossom and fruit grows. Heirloom seeds are true treasures, they’re art in the garden!

Brode Galeux d'Eyesine heirloom squash.

Brode Galeux d'Eyesine heirloom squash.

6 comments to Heirloom Vegetables: Art in the Garden

  • I play with my veggies, too. :) It’s always a fun surprise when people checking out the flower beds spot beans and cherry tomatoes sharing the space.

  • There is nothing better than an Heirloom variety of tomato. Ahh, mouth is watering just thinking about them. — Matti

  • Lisa

    I love the looks of surprise! It’s even better when friends come back and say “I planted vegetables in my flowers, too!” WOO HOO! :-)

  • Lisa

    Very true… heirloom tomatoes are far superior in taste, color and nutrition, the fact they they are so beautiful is a bonus! Enjoy and thanks for sharing, Matti!

  • Beautifully evocative post! (Can you honestly get sweet peas to bloom while tomatoes are ripening, though? Not in this climate. ;) )

  • Lisa

    My earliest ripening tomatoes come on in the first week of July and the peas are ripe around the third week of June so…maybe!! (Though the earliest tomatoes are determinate and “Caspian Pink” isn’t so that combination won’t work.) I love the possibilities! It’s almost as fun planning the plant combinations as it is harvesting the fruit of our labor! Enjoy and thank you for visiting!

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