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  • Specks of Spiders July 3, 2015
    Do you wipe webs off your plant leaves?  A few months back in late 2014 I had noticed some webbing on my Meyer Lemon tree.  “Meyer” lemon is a hybrid between a true lemon and mandarin orange and it is one of the non-native “cash crops” a.k.a. edibles that grace my beautiful wildlife garden.  I […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the be […]
    Loret T. Setters
  • Did that Cocoon Just Walk Away? June 19, 2015
    I love when something in my garden is being chewed on.  It means I am providing habitat and food for some species.  Needless to say, I got quite excited when I was down by the gate recently and I spotted a particular Sawtooth Blackberry (Rubus pensilvanicus) plant that looked all lacy. I have hundreds of […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see […]
    Loret T. Setters
  • The Box Turtle In The Garden June 17, 2015
    There is a precious, little animal inside that shell, his head sticking out of the house on his back, like an old man. They come out during wet weather. If it is raining, I can pretty well count on finding one trying to cross the road, no matter where my travels take me. I’ve made […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photo […]
    Brenda Clements Jones
  • Finding butterflies in my wildlife garden June 16, 2015
    The month of June is already shaping up to be a productive time for the butterflies that are supported by my beautiful wildlife garden.  As I was weeding and watering my veggie garden, a lovely Clouded Sulphur butterfly gracefully glided onto a patch of clover at my feet and deposited a single egg.  I bring […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to […]
    Judy Burris
  • Pollinator Week: More than Bees and Butterflies June 12, 2015
    Next week, June 15-22, 2015 is National Pollinator Week.  As we all know “butterfly gardens” are the rage. Of course everyone will set out to create a garden haven adding nectar and larval host plants to encourage the fluttering beauty of butterflies.  When bees join in the gardeners are thrilled as well, and often they […] We love hearing from you! Please c […]
    Loret T. Setters
  • Hop to it in the Garden June 5, 2015
    As springtime turns toward summer things are really starting to hop around here. Literally! Seems that this week I cannot walk a single path in my beautiful wildlife garden without tripping over one of our amphibian friends. Southern Leopard Frogs (Lithobates sphenocephalus) of all shapes and sizes startle me as I peruse the native plant […] We love hearing […]
    Loret T. Setters
  • A Dozen Dragonflies May 29, 2015
    This time of year it is always a playground of critters at my place. Especially noticeable in recent weeks is the return of the numerous species of dragonflies that grace my place. Having a pond is key to encouraging reproducing Odonata. Don’t have room for a pond? As long as there is a similar water […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all […]
    Loret T. Setters
  • Bird Population Soaring May 22, 2015
    Spring 2015 is once again proving to be a banner year for bird broods in my beautiful wildlife garden.  Bluebird brood #2 has successfully hatched and 4 healthy mockingbird babies located in a holly shrub not 15 feet away joined them this past week.  It is dizzying watching the two sets of parents feed the […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to s […]
    Loret T. Setters
  • Monarda Madness May 21, 2015
    The first Monarda blooms of 2015 opened up this week, kicking off a series of great blooms from now until late summer.  Every year I learn to appreciate this genus of native flowers so much more until I feel that I might just be on the edge of monarda madness because last year I actually […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautifu […]
    Ellen Honeycutt

#GardenChat

Weekend Update

Another busy weekend in the indoor garden. A Saturday check of the plants revealed herb roots peeking out of the sage and basil pots, lavender sprouting (The envelope said 21 days for germination, it’s been one week.), and FRAGRANCE! The scent of Thai basil was lingering in the air as I entered and, for a moment, I forgot I was inside in November. Add to that the scent of Silver Fir Tree tomato foliage as I rotated the pots and I was reminded this truly is a garden, regardless of location.

silver-fir-tree-leaf-heirloom-tomato-seedling

Silvery foliage of heirloom tomatoes.

organic-Thai-basil-seedling

Thai basil seedling.

organic-creeping-thyme-seedling

Purple creeping thyme.

herb-sage-seedling-indoor-garden

Wrinkled foliage of common sage.

Saturday also brought the mailman to our door with books. The weather is quickly changing and a few new reads aren’t as much a luxury as a necessity when the snow flies. New to the bookshelf:

  • “Second Nature” by Michael Pollan. Chosen by the American  Horticultural Society as one of the 25 greatest books ever written, it is (to quote Frank Levering) “…Part autobiography, part gardening book, part intellectual odyssey…”. A quick flip through the book and I’m already convinced Mr. Pollan and I share a gardening spirit.
  • “In Defense of Food” by Michael Pollan. The entire book expands on seven simple words delivered at the very start, “Eat food. Not too much. Mostly plants.” A revelation of how food was reduced to only selected nutrients and the effects it’s had on society.
  • “Food, Inc.” a guide by Participant media. The movie will change the way you look at food.  This book re-caps the movie’s messages as well as providing 13 original essays by experts illustrating the issues and providing challenges for the consumer to promote change.
  • “Restoring American gardens” by Denise wiles Adams. A hardcover encyclopedia of heirloom ornamental plants from 1640-1940. Full of vintage photos and glossy pictures as well as the history and culture of over 1,000 plants including trees, roses, annuals and perennials. Invaluable and beautiful.

pollan-schlosser-adams-books-organic-gardening

This weekend also blessed me with a gift from my hubby, a membership to Seed Saver’s Exchange. I’m thrilled to be a part of a network of grower’s all over the world dedicated to collecting, conserving and sharing heirloom seeds. Please consider joining a reputable seed saving organization or co-op or giving a membership as a gift. Help protect bio-diversity and our gardening heritage for our future and the future of our children.

seed-saver-exchange-membership-pamphlet

seed-savers-exchange-inside-membership-pamphlet

Finally, Sunday was jam-making day with fresh cranberries mixed with frozen strawberries saved from summer for Christmas Jam.(Recipe here.) Bright red and sweetly tart it’s perfect for toasted home-baked bread on snowy winter mornings. I like to tuck a few jars away for a delicious handmade gift. Now that I think about it, everything here would be a welcomed gift. They were for me!

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