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  • What’s Hiding in the Garden? September 2, 2014
    “We must look for a long time before we can see”. – Henry David Thoreau What is hiding in your native area? Thoreau says we must look a long time before we can see. It is easy to walk through and around your native plants  but how closely do you look? There are times I […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the beautiful photos and let us […]
    Joni James
  • In the Garden: Cloudy with a Chance of Confusion August 29, 2014
    I met a new butterfly this week.  This particular butterfly is one of the skippers. Skippers are in the Superfamily Hesperioidea, as opposed to say, Swallowtails or Milkweed Butterflies that are in the Papilionoidea Superfamily encompassing Butterflies (excluding skippers). Skippers are a diverse bunch and often hard to identify. This skipper was rather larg […]
    Loret T. Setters
  • Native Plants Beyond the Garden August 28, 2014
    I love having native plants in my garden. Every moment that I can do so finds me slipping into the garden to find a beautiful flower, a hummingbird sipping on cardinal flower (Lobelia cardinalis), an insect collecting food or collecting prey, and to listen to the sweet song of birds. As much as I love […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see al […]
    Ellen Honeycutt
  • When a Tree Falls in the Schoolyard August 25, 2014
    We had only one shade tree at our suburban DC elementary school, a 50ish-year-old pin oak, and it was cut down over the summer without notice. After the shock and swearing wore off, I started thinking about how we could use what remained. Almost anything can be turned into a lesson, including a prominently placed […] We love hearing from you! Please click he […]
    Stacey Evers
  • The Worms Crawl In but Do They Swim? August 22, 2014
    This week I noticed that there was some webbing on a Baldcypress tree I planted a while back. At some point my property was likely home to many of these trees as is evident by decaying knees I see when the pond level gets low.  These majestic trees require wet conditions during part of the year […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all the b […]
    Loret T. Setters
  • Native Shrubs for Small Gardens August 19, 2014
    For those with small wildlife gardens, gardening with native plants has always been a challenge. Natives tend to be not just large size but absolutely huge. Fortunately the nursery industry is responding to the growing demand for wildlife friendly native plants for the small space garden. Plant breeders have come out with some outstanding dwarf […] We love h […]
    Karyl Seppala
  • Wildlife Deception as a Defense August 15, 2014
    Tanner, the English Setter was headed out for his afternoon stroll of the yard.  I saw something over behind a tall cluster of Bidens alba and it seemed to be thrashing.  Tanner zoomed on over and flushed out a Red-Shouldered Hawk.  The hawk flew off with its feathers somewhat ruffled in the quick getaway. Tanner […] We love hearing from you! Please click he […]
    Loret T. Setters
  • Baldcypress Ecosystem August 13, 2014
    Birding in Delaware at Trap Pond State Park, a baldcypress ecosystem. After a wonderful trip aboard the Mummichog II for the Cape Water Taxi Ecotour to explore the ecosystem of the Indian River Bay in southeastern Delaware, today we headed to southwestern Delaware to explore a fresh water ecosystem. Trap Pond State Park, near Laurel, […] We love hearing from […]
    Carole Sevilla Brown
  • Cardinal Flower August 12, 2014
      Hummingbirds love it. So do I. If it was a Corvette Stingray, the color would be called “Victory Red.” It is a blazing, brilliant, red, not often seen in a native plant. In the picture above, you see a sweat bee, using a leaf as a resting spot on the Cardinal Flower’s, Lobelia cardinalis, landing […] We love hearing from you! Please click here to see all t […]
    Brenda Clements Jones

#GardenChat

In the Garden, Out of the Oven

We’ve been blessed with a mild, although dry, Autumn this year. Today was no exception with bright sunshine and nary a cloud to be seen. I checked the bulbs I (finally) planted to make sure the squirrels haven’t found them and picked a few China Rose radishes from the vegetable garden. The mild weather has kept the garden producing, ironically lack of rain has slowed it down. I’ve ordered row covers for next spring, but if they arrive before the ground freezes I may use them now for the fennel, beets, kale, radishes and cabbage lettuce. A few of the indoor Asian greens may be transplanted “under cover”, also. They’re very frost tolerant making them ideal candidates.

fall-garden-fennel-lisa-gustavson

fall-garden-escarole-seedlings-lisa-gustavson

For those (like me) that prefer a little spice with some sweet, here’s a recipe for snappy Ginger Crinkles. I baked a batch this afternoon when craving something ginger-y. For a sugar-restricted diet replace the sugar with one tablespoon powdered stevia and omit rolling the cookies in sugar; so yummy!

Ginger Crinkles:

  • 1c. white sugar or 1 Tbsp. powdered stevia
  • 3/4 c. butter or margarine
  • 1/4 c. dark molasses
  • 1 egg
  • 2 1/4 c. flour
  • 1 1/2 tsp. baking soda
  • 1 Tbsp. dried powdered ginger
  • 1 tsp. cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp. salt

Mix sugar (or stevia), butter, molasses and egg until well combined. Stir in flour, soda, cinnamon, ginger and salt. Roll cookies into 1″ balls and roll in sugar to coat. Bake in a 375 degree oven about 7 minutes for a soft cookie, 10 minutes for a crispier cookie. Remove from cookie sheet immediately and cool.

ginger-cookies-organic-recipe

Last but not least, I planted a few flower seeds for the indoor garden. Dwarf zinnias, French marigolds, Pansies and Alyssum. I may dig out a few more from the stash, but right now I have more seedlings to pot up. The eggplant and peppers are ready… five of each…that’s 100% germination! I love heirloom seeds…dependable, delicious and beautiful. Tomorrow I’ll share my all-time favorites and some new-to-my garden varieties I’m trying next year.

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